In transport_destination_concurrency_limit what does "destination" means exactly?

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In transport_destination_concurrency_limit what does "destination" means exactly?

Rodrigo Severo - Fábrica
Hi,


Trying to deal with a destination server that is really picky about
the speed I deliver messages to it.

In a setting like transport_destination_concurrency_limit what does
destination means exactly?

My doubt exists because I have more than one email address destination
domain that have the same MX records. As the destination server
apparently controls the rate of deliver per origin server IP address I
have to know if, for example, I have 2 email address destination
domains, example1.org and example2.org both with the same MX records:
let's say mail.example.org when I set:

smtp_destination_concurrency_limit = 2

what will happen if I send several emails for both email address
destination domains at the same time?

Will I have 2 simultaneous connections to mail.example.org or 4? The
destination in smtp_destination_concurrency_limit here is the MX final
domain or my email adresses destination domains (example1.org and
example2.org in this example)?


Regards,

Rodrigo Severo
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Re: In transport_destination_concurrency_limit what does "destination" means exactly?

Wietse Venema
Rodrigo Severo - F?brica:
> Hi,
>
>
> Trying to deal with a destination server that is really picky about
> the speed I deliver messages to it.
>
> In a setting like transport_destination_concurrency_limit what does
> destination means exactly?

That depends on the destination_recipient_limit setting, as documented
under

 default_destination_concurrency_limit (default: 20)

    The default maximal number of parallel deliveries to the same
    destination. This is the default limit for delivery via the
    lmtp(8), pipe(8), smtp(8) and virtual(8) delivery agents. With
    per-destination recipient limit > 1, a destination is a domain,
    otherwise it is a recipient.

For example, local delivery has a per-destination recipient limit
of 1, and the concurrency limit prevents one recipient from using
up all local delivery processes.

Other delivery agents have a per-destination recipient limit of 50
or so, and there, the concurrency limit prevents one domain from
using up all SMTP delivery processes.

        Wietse
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Re: In transport_destination_concurrency_limit what does "destination" means exactly?

Rodrigo Severo - Fábrica
On Sat, Aug 25, 2018 at 7:06 PM, Wietse Venema <[hidden email]> wrote:

> Rodrigo Severo - F?brica:
>> Hi,
>>
>>
>> Trying to deal with a destination server that is really picky about
>> the speed I deliver messages to it.
>>
>> In a setting like transport_destination_concurrency_limit what does
>> destination means exactly?
>
> That depends on the destination_recipient_limit setting, as documented
> under
>
>  default_destination_concurrency_limit (default: 20)
>
>     The default maximal number of parallel deliveries to the same
>     destination. This is the default limit for delivery via the
>     lmtp(8), pipe(8), smtp(8) and virtual(8) delivery agents. With
>     per-destination recipient limit > 1, a destination is a domain,
>     otherwise it is a recipient.
>
> For example, local delivery has a per-destination recipient limit
> of 1, and the concurrency limit prevents one recipient from using
> up all local delivery processes.
>
> Other delivery agents have a per-destination recipient limit of 50
> or so, and there, the concurrency limit prevents one domain from
> using up all SMTP delivery processes.

First of all, thanks for your prompt answer.

I've read this info. I understand that for other deliver agents, with
a per-destination limit greater than one, the limit is per domain.

My doubt is: in this case, "per domain" refers to "per email address
destination domain" or "per destination server domain (as indicated by
MX records)"?

Or saying it with another words: if 2 different email address
destination domain points to the same servers in their MX records,
will the limit be "per email address destination domain" or "per
destination server domain"?


Regards,

Rodrigo Severo