Spam best practices?

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Spam best practices?

Kevin O'Gorman
My system's email has been blocked by my ISP, so that I can no longer forward my own email from my local host to my ISP's web mail.
Accordingly, I'm missing mails that inform me how my system is performing.

I could go back to reading the stuff locally, and I'll do that as a stopgap.  I don't like this as a solution, however.

I have asked them why, but assume the answer will be the large amount of spam my account normally gets.  Frankly, that was one of the reasons I had been forwarding to them -- their spam filters were better than mine.  So even if I try to read mail locally, I'll need better spam filters (volume is several hundred messages
per day).

Starting from scratch, but I expect to continue running postfix.  The box is gentoo, and I can quickly set up most other tools I would need.

My main questions:
1) where's the best source of beginner info about how to do this.  It needs to start from scratch.  Existing documentation and most of the conversations on this list seem to assume knowledge I don't yet have, like what it means to have recipient_mangle_maps_somethingorother.  Or where it goes.  Or what supporting databases or configurations it needs.  I'm really new at this.

2) Is there as set of best practices, or are there competing approaches?  What's best for a site with a single system with a single user with a couple of domain names (for different projects)?  I have a couple of other computers, but they're more-or-less isolated from the email world, they have no MX records and they just forward syslog things to root on the main system.  I have a few robot accounts that receive mail, but I've never seen them get spammed because their names are not easily guessed, they do nothing on the web, and they don't send mail to humans, just queries to other robots.

--
Kevin O'Gorman, PhD
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Re: Spam best practices?

Sahil Tandon
Kevin O'Gorman wrote:

> My system's email has been blocked by my ISP, so that I can no longer
> forward my own email from my local host to my ISP's web mail.
> Accordingly, I'm missing mails that inform me how my system is performing.
>
> I could go back to reading the stuff locally, and I'll do that as a
> stopgap.  I don't like this as a solution, however.
>
> I have asked them why, but assume the answer will be the large amount of
> spam my account normally gets.  Frankly, that was one of the reasons I
> had been forwarding to them -- their spam filters were better than
> mine.  So even if I try to read mail locally, I'll need better spam
> filters (volume is several hundred messages
> per day).
>
> Starting from scratch, but I expect to continue running postfix.  The
> box is gentoo, and I can quickly set up most other tools I would need.
>
> My main questions:
> 1) where's the best source of beginner info about how to do this.  It
> needs to start from scratch.  Existing documentation and most of the
> conversations on this list seem to assume knowledge I don't yet have,
> like what it means to have recipient_mangle_maps_somethingorother.  

There is a lot of good of documentation here:
http://www.postfix.org/documentation.html and it is fine for even the
beginner to Postfix (though perhaps not a UNIX beginner; but then this
is the wrong mailing list ;-).  Feel free to ask specific questions
about a setup or parameters you don't understand.  Good luck.

--
Sahil Tandon <[hidden email]>
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Re: Spam best practices?

MrC-7
> Kevin O'Gorman wrote:
>>
>> Starting from scratch, but I expect to continue running postfix.  The
>> box is gentoo, and I can quickly set up most other tools I would need.
>>
>> My main questions:
>> 1) where's the best source of beginner info about how to do this.  It
>> needs to start from scratch.  Existing documentation and most of the
>> conversations on this list seem to assume knowledge I don't yet have,
>> like what it means to have recipient_mangle_maps_somethingorother.  
>

Consider The Book of Postfix.  It is excellent and will walk you through
the steps.

http://www.postfix-book.com/