Virtual Domain

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Virtual Domain

Me
If a server software can handle one domain, why can't it handle two or more in the same manner?  Why must other domains be seen as somehow less in importance by labeling them "Virtual"?  Regardless of where the server is physically located IP-wise, why not just design the software to do multiples of its basic function?

I hope the reader can see the relationship between these questions.  Feel free to ask for clarification on any point.

Thank you.
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Re: Virtual Domain

Noel Jones-2
On 1/2/2019 12:12 PM, Me wrote:
> If a server software can handle one domain, why can't it handle two
> or more in the same manner?  Why must other domains be seen as
> somehow less in importance by labeling them "Virtual"?  Regardless
> of where the server is physically located IP-wise, why not just
> design the software to do multiples of its basic function?

User namespace is the main issue.

If all the users of all mail domains handled by a server are listed
in the system password file, then you just add all the domains to
mydestination. This also implies that bob@example1 is the same
person as bob@example2.  Postfix handles this easily, but this is
not a common situation.

If each domain has its own user list, then there must be some way to
list which users go with which domain. Postfix calls these virtual
domains.  This also allows for bob@example1 and bob@example2 to be
different people.   This is by far more common.


>
> I hope the reader can see the relationship between these questions. 
> Feel free to ask for clarification on any point.
>

You will probably benefit greatly by studying the basics of computer
mail.


Change your mail display name.  Mail arriving labeled from "Me" when
it obviously isn't might be considered abusive or a spoofing attempt.




  -- Noel Jones
Me
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Re: Virtual Domain

Me
Thank you very much.  That was very helpful.  Especially that part where you stated "Postfix calls these virtual domains".  It is always a problem trying to figure out another individual's meaning with the words used.  All the research I did in understanding the meaning of words like Virtual and Domain over the years never prepared me for mind reading. ;)

Bottom line, whenever a person is trying to learn a new piece of software, it sure helps to understand where the programmer was coming from and his/her meanings.  I know that my understanding of e-mail systems and how they work will never prepare me for understanding others.

By the way, I fixed the address problem.  I just prefer to remain anonymous.

Thanks again for the help.



On 1/2/19 1:50 PM, Noel Jones wrote:
On 1/2/2019 12:12 PM, Me wrote:
If a server software can handle one domain, why can't it handle two
or more in the same manner?  Why must other domains be seen as
somehow less in importance by labeling them "Virtual"?  Regardless
of where the server is physically located IP-wise, why not just
design the software to do multiples of its basic function?
User namespace is the main issue.

If all the users of all mail domains handled by a server are listed
in the system password file, then you just add all the domains to
mydestination. This also implies that bob@example1 is the same
person as bob@example2.  Postfix handles this easily, but this is
not a common situation.

If each domain has its own user list, then there must be some way to
list which users go with which domain. Postfix calls these virtual
domains.  This also allows for bob@example1 and bob@example2 to be
different people.   This is by far more common.


I hope the reader can see the relationship between these questions. 
Feel free to ask for clarification on any point.

You will probably benefit greatly by studying the basics of computer
mail.


Change your mail display name.  Mail arriving labeled from "Me" when
it obviously isn't might be considered abusive or a spoofing attempt.




  -- Noel Jones