retirement

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retirement

John Allen
Retirement - Mine.

I have finally persuaded my family that it would be a good idea to give up on the family server.

I have two, probably minor, problems
  1. informing senders of recipients address change.
  2. redirect to recipients new address.
  3. how to transfer existing imap folders to new service - probably gmail.
Not all existing user want to to continue receiving email.

1. can probably be achieved with a relocation map, but I am not sure how to combine it wit 2 and possibly 3.
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Re: retirement

Erwan David
On Mon, Mar 16, 2015 at 03:04:57AM CET, John Allen <[hidden email]> said:

> Retirement - Mine.
>
> I have finally persuaded my family that it would be a good idea to give up on
> the family server.
>
> I have two, probably minor, problems
>
>  1. informing senders of recipients address change.
>  2. redirect to recipients new address.
>  3. how to transfer existing imap folders to new service - probably gmail.
>
> Not all existing user want to to continue receiving email.
>
> 1. can probably be achieved with a relocation map, but I am not sure how to
> combine it wit 2 and possibly 3.

For 3 you can probabky use something like imapfilter to copy the emails through imap.

For combining 1 and the orthers, I would use a recipient_bcc_maps
sending a copy to the new address, in addition to the relocation_map
to inform the senders (note that informing the senders is also
informing the spammers, so maybe first retrieving the senders of
emails in boxes and informing them would be better).


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Re: retirement

DTNX Postmaster
In reply to this post by John Allen
On 16 Mar 2015, at 03:04, John Allen <[hidden email]> wrote:

Retirement - Mine.

I have finally persuaded my family that it would be a good idea to give up on the family server.

I have two, probably minor, problems
  1. informing senders of recipients address change.
  2. redirect to recipients new address.
  3. how to transfer existing imap folders to new service - probably gmail.
Not all existing user want to to continue receiving email.

1. can probably be achieved with a relocation map, but I am not sure how to combine it wit 2 and possibly 3.

We have used imapsync quite succesfully in the past for #3;


As for #1 and #2; we usually do that by having the users notify the people they want to receive mail from, giving them a grace period in which their mail still works and gets forwarded, and then shutting it down after a while. The notification can happen via a method of their choice, whether it's them sending out an email, posting something on Facebook for their friends to (hopefully) see, and so on.

I've never felt the relocation maps to be particularly useful in this. The percentage of people that read AND understand the bounce message is so low that it approaches zero, most of the time, so making it the user's 'manual' responsibility generally works best.

If you want to shut down the machine before this grace period is past, you could move the domain to an external service, pay them for a year, and shut it down after that?

Mvg,
Joni

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RE: retirement

Dudi Goldenberg
In reply to this post by Erwan David
-----Original Message-----
From: [hidden email] [mailto:[hidden email]] On Behalf Of Erwan David
Sent: Monday, March 16, 2015 08:37
To: [hidden email]
Subject: Re: retirement

On Mon, Mar 16, 2015 at 03:04:57AM CET, John Allen <[hidden email]> said:

> Retirement - Mine.
>
> I have finally persuaded my family that it would be a good idea to give up on
> the family server.
>
> I have two, probably minor, problems
>
>  1. informing senders of recipients address change.
>  2. redirect to recipients new address.
>  3. how to transfer existing imap folders to new service - probably gmail.
>
> Not all existing user want to to continue receiving email.
>
> 1. can probably be achieved with a relocation map, but I am not sure how to
> combine it wit 2 and possibly 3.

Look for larch, specifically made to handle IMAP migrates to gmail.

I have used it for other IMAP servers besides gmail, works like a charm.

D.
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Re: retirement

Noel Jones-2
In reply to this post by John Allen
On 3/15/2015 9:04 PM, John Allen wrote:

> Retirement - Mine.
>
> I have finally persuaded my family that it would be a good idea to
> give up on the family server.
>
> I have two, probably minor, problems
>
>  1. informing senders of recipients address change.
>  2. redirect to recipients new address.
>  3. how to transfer existing imap folders to new service - probably
>     gmail.
>
> Not all existing user want to to continue receiving email.
>
> 1. can probably be achieved with a relocation map, but I am not sure
> how to combine it wit 2 and possibly 3.


If you're already considering gmail, also consider moving your
domain to google apps.  Pricing is reasonable (free in some cases)
and you avoid the whole issue of changing addresses.

As already suggested, imapsync is a reasonable way to move mail to
whatever new system.  If it's only a few users, you can also use a
GUI mail client (eg. Thunderbird) and just drag stuff between
folders on the different systems.


  -- Noel Jones
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Re: retirement

DTNX Postmaster
On 16 Mar 2015, at 14:57, Noel Jones <[hidden email]> wrote:

> On 3/15/2015 9:04 PM, John Allen wrote:
>> Retirement - Mine.
>>
>> I have finally persuaded my family that it would be a good idea to
>> give up on the family server.
>>
>> I have two, probably minor, problems
>>
>> 1. informing senders of recipients address change.
>> 2. redirect to recipients new address.
>> 3. how to transfer existing imap folders to new service - probably
>>    gmail.
>>
>> Not all existing user want to to continue receiving email.
>>
>> 1. can probably be achieved with a relocation map, but I am not sure
>> how to combine it wit 2 and possibly 3.
>
> If you're already considering gmail, also consider moving your
> domain to google apps.  Pricing is reasonable (free in some cases)
> and you avoid the whole issue of changing addresses.
>
> As already suggested, imapsync is a reasonable way to move mail to
> whatever new system.  If it's only a few users, you can also use a
> GUI mail client (eg. Thunderbird) and just drag stuff between
> folders on the different systems.

The free tier for Google Apps was retired not too long ago, with
existing free customers grandfathered in. So if I am not mistaken your
only option at this point is the $50/account/year tier? Still not too
bad, but it adds up rather quickly for something that's essentially
family and friends. The free tier was limited to 10 accounts, too.

Another possible option; set up Gmail, and have them RPOP their old
account during the grace period. Gmail supports that, IIRC.

Mvg,
Joni

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Re: retirement

John Allen
In reply to this post by John Allen
On 3/15/2015 10:04 PM, John Allen wrote:
Retirement - Mine.

I have finally persuaded my family that it would be a good idea to give up on the family server.

I have two, probably minor, problems
  1. informing senders of recipients address change.
  2. redirect to recipients new address.
  3. how to transfer existing imap folders to new service - probably gmail.
Not all existing user want to to continue receiving email.

1. can probably be achieved with a relocation map, but I am not sure how to combine it wit 2 and possibly 3.
Thanks for the input.
I was going to go with a variation on the imapsync, sending everybody a notice of the address changes.

However, FYI, I am not retiring, I am allowed to retire. Maybe I can get my grandson to take over.
Once I started to do something about this family panic set in, you probably heard the howls of protest if you lived in Antarctica.

Once again thanks for the input!
--
John Allen
KlaM

OK, so what is the speed of dark?

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